Hamilton Fringe Festival

An 11-day unjuried theatre festival that happens every summer in downtown Hamilton

The Fringe Blog!

The Work in Progress: Part 1

The Work in Progress: Part 1

Written by: Ryan M. Sero “You have to come and see my show,” is the mating cry of the artist. You can hear this yelled on street corners during every Art Crawl and every line-up at the Fringe Festival. This is the basic element of the indie theatre beat, artists who need you, the audience, to stay still for an hour (or more or less) and take in the thing they have made. The most basic elements are word of mouth, press releases, previews, reviews, flyers, and posters, and that foghorn blast, “You have to come and see my show,” spoken as a plea, both for the welfare of the performer and for the welfare of the audience member; the artist knows that you might miss something special. There’s another way to let people “in” on a show’s merits, to show them more directly that something special is going on. Many artists document their process – they record (somehow) their behind-the-scenes work – and use this document to show patrons (you – yes: you!) what they stand to miss out on. Over the past few days, I’ve been speaking with some of the companies involved in the Frost Bites about their documentation and marketing and what that means for their process. This is “part one” of a two-part blog where I talk with four of the Frost Bites performers. In this instalment, I talk with Alyssa Nedich and Jeremy Freiburger about their process documentation and how they market their shows. I spoke first with Alyssa Nedich, choreographer for the show Deva. She has been using social media to disseminate videos of her team at work. As useful as this is for marketing, the clips are originally created during rehearsals for another reason. “We always document so the dancers can look back at videos for references outside of rehearsal. Also I keep all videos I film of rehearsals in case I ever want to bring a piece back for something in the future.” second Deva rehearsal was a blast today. These girls are seriously blowing me away! @sdowhun @liz_dance8 @lgiovinazzo #dance #frostbites #hamont A post shared by Alyssa Nedich (@anedich) on Dec 28, 2015 at 3:19pm PST Nedich is focused on using these clips to improve the work – that comes first. Any marketing acquired through this documentation is the cherry on top. “If someone sees one of my 15 second clips that we share and sees how talented the dancers are and it inspires them to come and see us, that’s excellent!” The clips themselves are short, usually fifteen seconds long. That might not seem like a lot, but after watching a bunch, the information conveyed is massive. Even though a full sense of the piece’s arc cannot be gleaned, a viewer can quickly see the talent and effort being put in here. These women are working hard and creating something very interesting. They’re well worth watching and really show some intriguing work. Nedich tells me the clips are used to fine tune the piece moreso than completely reshape it. It’s rare, she says, that she re-choreographs the work based on these videos, but says that the video clips do affect the work, allowing her and the dancers to hone and fine-tune their piece. One more because these girls...

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Beating the post-Fringe Blues

Beating the post-Fringe Blues

Written by Annalee Flint With another Hamilton Fringe Festival recently finished, many members of the theatre community have the “Post-Fringe Blues”. Something about working so hard on something and spending so much time with like-minded people make it a bit of a let down once it is all over. Yet we also think about how lucky we are to have such an event in this city. A place where a variety of genres and styles of independent theatre can flourish. A place where theatre artists and patrons (and artists who are also patrons) can mingle while discussing, debating, and inspiring one another. A place that brings together people from every corner of the theatre community with such an incredible sense of camaraderie. It would be wonderful if we could keep that feeling going all year round. Of course it is unrealistic to think that it’s possible but wouldn’t it be nice if we didn’t have to wait a whole year for another event like that?   That’s what the participants of the Artistic Leadership and Entrepreneurial Training (ALERT) program, which is run by the Hamilton Fringe Festival, were thinking about when given the task of producing a winter theatre festival. And thus, The Frost Bites Festival was born. With the tremendous success and growth of the Hamilton Fringe Festival in recent years there is obviously a strong desire in this city for unique and independent theatre offerings. As the Fringe has expanded its audience size, number of performances and venues it uses, it would also be great to be able to expand the amount of independent theatre that occurs year-round. Many Fringe Festivals across Canada have associated winter festivals, the Next Stage Theatre Festival in Toronto and the Undercurrents Festival in Ottawa to name a couple, so creating a winter festival associated with the Hamilton Fringe seems to be the next logical step in its expansion. The ALERT team, under Hamilton Fringe Festival guidance, was given the duty to figure out what we wanted out of a winter festival. What we came up with is an incredibly exciting event that will have people hyped up about the future of theatre in Hamilton. Frost Bites was created to energize and strengthen independent theatre in Hamilton. There has been a real push in the past few years to give a platform to new works by local artists and playwrights. The HamilTen Festival and the Player’s Guild First Stage Series are two excellent examples of that. The Frost Bites Festival aims to be another place where artists will go to innovate and develop their original work to showcase what homegrown talent has to offer.   “THINK OF IT AS A BUFFET.” We wanted to foster a unique and innovative theatre event while appealing to a broad audience that includes both theatregoers as well as people who may otherwise shy away from the theatre. The result is a site-specific performance event. Site-specific theatre has many definitions, depending on who you talk to, but the simplest description of it is theatre that is created for and/or informed by the particular space the work will be performed in. The idea of Frost Bites being a site-specific festival is to demystify the world of theatre and perhaps even make it more casual. Some people can be intimidated...

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Full of Laughs: The Fringe Talk Show!

Full of Laughs: The Fringe Talk Show!

Larry Smith is the host of the nightly Fringe Talk Show at the Fringe Club (aka the Baltimore House) This will be his SIXTH year hosting! He tells us a little about the show and what it means to him.   I am so looking forward to my 6th year hosting the “FRINGE TALK SHOW”. Not only is it a great time, full of laughs and entertainment but it’s an entertaining and informative forum for shows at the Fringe, not only as a way to promote the show, but also a great way for audiences to hear about the inspiration, and a lot about the work that went into each show. All walks of Fringe life are interviewed, including actors, directors, and producers, as well as the all important seldom seen heroes of the Fringe-  the tech people, volunteers, and designers.   A lot of the live entertainment during the talk show, is provided by performers in Fringe shows. In the past we’ve featured music, poetry, dance, puppets, magic, cooking demos, and more! As host I also present a small stand up comedy set at the start of each talk show (I celebrated 26 years as a fulltime comic in April) and I turn each guest’s name into a cartoon picture while their interview takes place. We have quizzes, games, and other fun stuff to keep the audience involved. On the final night of the talk show, “The 6th ANNUAL LARRY AWARDS” will once again be presented to Fringe shows, and people from the audience that have joined us for the fun, that is “THE FRINGE TALK SHOW” Over the past years it has been my absolute pleasure to facilitate a forum where talented people from all over the map, can not only promote their shows, but also through an interview give us a deeper look, and understanding of their production. My motto for the “FRINGE TALK SHOW” has always been….“It’s a show FOR and ABOUT everything FRINGE” I’ve met great people over the last few years, so come on out to the BALTIMORE HOUSE each night of the festival at 9 p.m. and have a blast like we’ve had over the past 6...

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The Top 5 Trends at the HamOnt Fringe

The Top 5 Trends at the HamOnt Fringe

Article contributed by: Stephen Near Stephen is a writer and performer in Finding Mr. Right, which plays at the festival starting on Friday July 17 The Hamilton Fringe hasn’t started yet but in just over a week we’ll be up and running. The Festival has grown by leaps and bounds in recent years and that means more shows and more artists are flooding the festival schedule with a wide variety of shows. If you’re like me, you want to see as much as you can but are also curious to see what sorts of shows will be onstage for this year’s festival. Are there any particular trends making waves or any particular styles or stories emerging from the pack? Having taken a look through this year’s schedule, here’s my take on the top five trends for #HamFringe 1. #FemmeFringeHamOnt Borrowing a trending hashtag from Toronto’s Fringe, this year’s festival will see a great number of shows written, produced and/or starring women. From one person monologues to full length plays, these shows highlight the talents of just some of the women making waves in Canadian theatre nowadays.   Hamilton Arts Award winner Lisa Pijuan-Nomura premieres She Said Saffron, while Canadian Comedy Award-nominated performer Colette Kendal brings her smash-hit The Cockwhisperer…A Love Story to the Festival. Canadian Comedy Award Nominee Christel Bartelse performs her critically-acclaimed ONEymoon, while Toronto-based improviser Magdalena BB brings Death and Dating to the stage, and emerging Hamilton performer Rose Hopkins performs The Rabbit Done Died. Alyson Parovel premieres her socially-conscious Always Unique, Totally Interesting, Sometimes Mysterious, and watch for Kelly Morden and Emma Letki‘s delightful kids show Thumped! alongside Hamilton’s own Studio Babette Puppet Theatre with Where Are You Cinderella? 2. Flying Solo A staple of any Fringe Festival is the one person show. Drawing upon a wide variety of disciplines from physical theatre to storytelling to stand-up, one person shows offer audiences an intimate connection to a single performer onstage. Some solo shows are found in other categories so you’ll want to check out some other of this year’s highlights.   Harrison Wheeler’s acclaimed Jesters Incognito makes a return to the Fringe, while magician Chris Bruce tells us Why Card Tricks Are Important. Celebrated British comedian & storyteller Gerard Harris offers A Tension To Detail, and local actor/activist Adam Bryan performs Homeschool Dropout, while Hamilton stage veteran Julian Nicholson tells of Drinking, Fighting, and Fishing, Toronto stage performer Michael Posthumus commands KNEEL! DIAMOND DOGS, while standup comedian and storyteller Zak McDonald recounts The Happiest Story I Know, and Richard Lett brings us Sober But Never Clean. 3. The Big Show Although this year’s festival has many small shows with one or two performers, there are some that have far more company members sharing the stage. Large ensembles, telling grander tales, seem to be a growing rarity in the Fringe circuit so you’ll want to be sure to get to some of the following shows by some notable Hamilton theatre artists.   The 10/10/10 Project is an ambitious multidisciplinary piece by acclaimed Fringe veteran Aaron Jan, who is also premiering the comedic ensemble Rowing with Chrysalis Workshop. Long time Fringe favourite and award-winning Make Art Theatre brings Shakespeare back with Much Ado About Nothing, while Kintsukuroi Productions and Hammer Entertainment present the interdisciplinary ensemble piece Bloom. Toronto’s Aidan Tozer...

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Fringe for the Whole Family!

Fringe for the Whole Family!

School is out for the summer, and if you’re looking for all-ages fun at the Hamilton Fringe, look no further! Geared towards entertaining children and adults alike, Family Fringe has two amazing shows and FREE activities every Saturday during the Festival.   We spoke to Studio Babette Puppet Theatre member Kerry Panavas from Where are you Cinderella?, as well as Toronto-based dance artists Emma Letki and Kelly Morden from Ten Toes Productions, who are bringing their delightful show Thumped! to the Theatre Aquarius Studio.   What are the most rewarding and challenging parts of creating an original show geared towards children and families? Emma and Kelly: It’s rewarding when children look up to you and you have the ability to enhance and expand their imaginations while encouraging their creativity as well. It can be challenging to create a dance show that translates clearly for young audiences while also trying to appeal to adults. It’s important to us that the adults in the audience enjoy the show just as much as the kids because it is ultimately the parent’s decision to take their kids to see us perform. Kerry: Making a show that appeals to all ages is a rewarding challenge, because although the entertainment must be geared to the youngest ages, we also want the parents to come away with a smile on their face, which means the mature ones in the audience have a little chuckle too!   2)   Although this is your first time participating in Hamilton Family Fringe, both of your companies have experience performing child-friendly theatre. Has there been a particularly memorable audience reaction from one of your past shows? Kerry: We perform a show called Young Sophia: the Dundurn Castle Diary, inspired by the diary of Sophia MacNab, written in 1846, aged 13, at Dundurn Castle. The way students of today react to, and sympathize with, the trials and tribulations of Victorian children, is always heart-warming and totally endearing. Emma and Kelly: It’s funny because we originally didn’t see our company doing children’s theater. However, after our audience’s reaction from Pluto’s Revenge in the 2012 Toronto Fringe Festival, we realized that our style of theatre tends to bring out the silly playful side in adults while at the same time bringing about themes of vulnerability. When Ted Fox from Evi-Dance Radio approached us and asked us why we weren’t classifying our work as children’s theatre, and we were stumped, it suddenly all made sense! It was like we found our unicorn. Kelly has become very active in children’s dance education since Pluto’s Revenge in 2012 and her experiences with kids have added a whole new layer to our work. 3) What do you hope Hamilton audiences take away from your show? Emma and Kelly: We hope that our show will inspire Hamilton audiences to cherish, preserve and explore the diverse and rich environments that surround their own backyards. We hope that our show will encourage children to take their imaginations outside and explore the types of entertainment that nature has to offer. Kerry: That you are never too young, or too old, for fairy tales! And that puppets speak a universal language for children, who seem to immediately suspend any disbelief, and embrace the idea that these puppets are actually living, breathing...

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Artists Emerging from the Indie Scene in Hamilton

Artists Emerging from the Indie Scene in Hamilton

ALERT (Artistic Leadership and Entrepreneurial Training) is a new year-round arts education initiative that connects emerging artists in Hamilton, gives them opportunities to participate in workshops led by top professionals in Canadian theatre, and engages them in planning committees for a winter festival- set to launch in February 2016. As emerging artists, many of the participants have shows of their own in the 2015 Hamilton Fringe, including Esther Huh and Rose Hopkins. Rose will be performing her one-woman show, The Rabbit Done Died, as part of the Gallery Series, while Esther is acting in Make Art Theatre’s production of Much Ado About Nothing. We spoke to both of them about their experiences as young artists in Hamilton’s burgeoning theatre scene!   1) How important is community in the Hamilton indie theatre scene right now? ESTHER: Very! Hamilton indie theatre is just getting established and as such, there are few formal avenues to organize. That’s the challenge and beauty of any indie theatre scene – those that are motivated to make art, will, but motivation is essential. In a place like Hamilton, where the community informs the kind of stories you want to tell and produces storytellers of many different backgrounds, the necessity of drawing on others for support and the practical needs of putting on a show make the experience richer. ROSE: SO IMPORTANT! When I moved back to Hamilton last year after finishing my BFA in Windsor, I was blown away at how welcoming the theatre community was. I’ve met so many people in a short period of time who have been so generous with their mentorship and support. If it weren’t for them, I don’t think I would have created Mooncalf Theatre or be producing The Rabbit Done Died at the Fringe this year.     2) What are the benefits and challenges of spending time with young emerging artists, as you learn together? ROSE: The benefits: Hearing about the awesome projects my ALERT colleagues are working on, learning new things about the way they work, create, and produce, and applying bits and pieces of that to my own process The challenges: Trying to get eighteen extremely passionate and creative minds to focus on one thing at a time. ESTHER: Young artists have an amazing energy, especially when they get together. There’s an optimism that comes with being a young emerging artist. The other part of being a young emerging artist is the “young” part – we collectively don’t have a lot of experience, especially when it comes to the practicalities of doing big things.     3) Although it is early on in the program, has ALERT changed your expectations or inspired you to reach new goals? ESTHER: The program is making me realize that generally, my expectations for myself are far too low. My cynicism stops me from taking on big projects sometimes. I’m learning that the best way to conquer a lack of experience is go ahead and do whatever and trust that the effort will be rewarding in the long run (and the short run too, hopefully). ROSE: I love the workshops and planning we do at ALERT meetings, but more than that, I love chatting with the other artists on breaks and talking about the struggles we’re all facing as new emerging professionals. It...

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Gallery shows that GREW

Gallery shows that GREW

Two of the full-length shows programmed at the Hamilton Fringe Festival this year premiered as short pieces in the Gallery mini-Series: Trevor Copp’s Air appeared at the 2014 Fringe and Radha Menon’s Ghost Train Riders (which has now been developed into the full-length Rukmini’s Gold) was a part of the 2013 festival. We spoke to playwright/creators Radha and Trevor about what role the shorter presentations at the Gallery mini-Series played in their development and how their shows have grown since!   How has your show changed since it was in the Gallery mini-Series? TREVOR:  Back then, I didn’t know what I had. I was throwing stuff against the wall to see what would stick. I since stepped back to ask what it was I am trying to accomplish, to bring intelligence (and work and design and more rehearsal….) to what was instinct. Now the piece incorporates full design, is double the length, and reflects the fact that I know I’ve found a voice in this work. RADHA:   Thanks to an OAC grant, I was able to develop the initial scene Ghost Train Riders into a full-length play over four-months that summer and have a staged reading in December 2013 at the Lyric Theatre. In development with Kali Theatre (U.K), the play was then workshopped by six actors in London led by director Trilby James in July 2014 and these explorations provided real breakthroughs. Readers’ notes were provided and a new draft was written and had a staged reading at Tristan Bates Theatre in Covent Garden as part of Kali Theatre Talkback 2015. It started off as a 20 minute show and has grown to 100 minutes (we are cutting a scene to keep within the 90 minute show slot for the Fringe.)   What is the value of having an audience while your show is still “young”? RADHA:   I fall in love with many of my characters and as with other things one loves, one hope that others will love them too. Having audiences see seed plays really helps because it gives a writer the certainty that this story and these characters are worth the time spent developing them. I was blown away by the audience response from Ghost Train Riders at our Gallery Series show – it struck a chord with so many people, mostly everyone was able to relate to this play and all the positive feedback reassured me that this certainly should be a full-length play. TREVOR:   In physical theatre especially, the audience is the final scene partner. Until they show up, I really don’t know if we’re together and really in flow. I got to find out what worked and where the holes are. I actually got out to Ottawa and St. Catherine’s as well to keep testing the material. I wouldn’t call this process ‘valuable’ – for my kind of work, it’s a requirement to achieve the kind of quality that makes a show last years.   The Gallery mini-Series is billed as SHORT shows in SMALL spaces. When did you know that your SHORT show would grow larger and your SMALL space would need to be bigger?   TREVOR:   The combination of people asking if I’d do the old pieces again and the new pieces keeping me up at night because they didn’t exist yet. RADHA:  I had already planned to...

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Stage Directions: Second Edition

Stage Directions: Second Edition

Stage Directions: Imagining the next steps for theatre in Hamilton (An Open Space Meeting) How do we build a better, stronger theatre culture in Hamilton? Who is responsible? What is your role? What does the future look like?   In March 2014, about 60 artists from the Greater Hamilton Region gathered together for a full day of discussion about the future of theatre in Hamilton. The day was filled with dynamic and passionate dialogue about the state of the performing arts in the city. This meeting of minds led to the formation of several fruitful partnerships and the launch of a series of new programs. So we have decided to do it again.   On Saturday March 14th from 10am-5pm, we invite the theatre and performing arts communities in Hamilton to gather for an ‘Open Space’ meeting to talk about the future.   Do you want to help direct growth in the Hamilton theatre community? Let’s get together and talk about it. Join in the discussions! Connect with like-minded people!   How do ‘Open Space’ meetings work? Open Space is a meeting style meant to harness the intelligence and passion of the people in the room. Participants meet all together, and then form smaller groups around their specific area of interest. Much unscripted dialogue to follow! Then we join up again to share ideas for growth. The agenda is set on the day by you – the passionate people who show up to talk, plan, scheme, and get things done.   Who will be there? Everyone who is a stakeholder in the community is invited to attend! Actors, directors, designers, writers, producers, musicians, singers, performing artists, translators, technicians, dancers, teachers….. Anyone interested in the theatre culture in Hamilton! Anyone passionate to see it grow… The DETAILS: Date:              Saturday March 14, 2015 Time:             10am-5pm* Location:      Players Guild of Hamilton Fee:                $10 Sign up:  Advance registration is required. Limited space available. The event filled up very quickly in 2014. Please BOOK EARLY to avoid disappointment. Book ONLINE HERE. A dynamic way to affect understanding and aspirations in our theatre community. Be a part of this vital process! *please note: This is a FULL-DAY event. Pizza lunch will be provided!   Stage Directions 2015 is presented by the following partner organizations: Cobalt Connects, Hamilton Arts Council, Hamilton Fringe Festival, The Player’s Guild, Theatre Aquarius  ...

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“…We Won At Theatre.” Romeo & Juliet: An Escapist Comedy

Written by Denyse Terry Edited by Rebecca Raveendran Ryan M. Sero and company return to the Fringe this year with Romeo and Juliet: An Escapist Comedy. Sero typically relies on small teams and exchanging characters. With six cast members and a dizzying array of roles, Sero remains true to style. Taking the tale about two star-crossed lovers and their feuding families, Sero goes full absurdist on us. From their press kit: “Romeo has a lot on his mind: his girlfriend has dumped him, he just fell in love with Juliet, the daughter of his enemies, the Capulets, and he can’t find meaning in life. Not only that, but try finding a decent barber.” The affable 27 year old explains, “It’s vaudeville turns into Marx brothers turns into Greek Tragedy.” The Fringe has been home to a few of make.art. theatre’s productions. A Modicum of Freedom was ‘Pick of the Fringe’ in 2009. In Between Places happened in 2010. Don Quixote followed at the 2011 Fringe Festival and was playfully nominated for “Best use of a wheel barrel” by View Magazine. Last year we got Jack and Jill Bieber-Fever a ‘Best in Venue’ winner. Romeo and Juliet: An Escapist Comedy got its start at Theatre Aquarius’ Playwright’s Unit two years ago. What initially started out as an assignment turned out to be a hit which he took to the Pearl Company Canadian Theatre Festival in 2012 where it was the best attended show. “The dialogue is witty, smart and hilarious.” Ontario Arts Review 2012 “I’ve sort of Woody Allan-ized it.”says Sero, referring to his oft sited inspiration who he admires in part for the way he takes “…big things, like love and death; those themes are never exhausted. They are equally unfathomable.” Sero takes 60 minutes to explore those themes, “…from a different angle, using comedy.” More comfortable when he is either writing or acting, Sero is cast as Romeo. Directing this romp through love is Tyler Brent. Well known for the Hamilton grown Sketch Comedy Troupe The Ugly Stiks and last year’s Zombie hit, Bridezilla vs The Apocalypse, Brent has a well-developed funny bone himself. The two met at Fringe 2010 when they shared a venue for their plays (Brent’s Purple and Sero’s In Between Places). Both successful, Sero says that’s when he first heard a now favourite line, “We won at theatre.” Since then they have worked together often, alternating acting and directing roles. Brent teaches by day and just seems so staid-like it’s always fun to see his comedic take on things, this time as Tybalt (cousin to Juliet, rival of Romeo’s) as well as Juliet’s wet-nurse! and confidante. The role of Juliet is played by Hamiltonian Annalee Flint (Billyboy, and Anno Domini 3048, both 2008). “I love Annalee’s Juliet.” Says Sean Emberley (Grey Gardens, To Kill A Mockingbird, Amigo’s Blue Guitar) A musician and actor, Emberley’s love of theatre started in high school but he left it alone for 17 years until one night he saw a performance by the Ugly Stiks and, “I was amazed by it. That people could do that and actually make a living.” He volunteered at Hamilton Urban Theatre, and got to know Brent while working on a number of the Bard’s works (also with Hammer Entertainment). Emberley has four roles,...

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Shelley Marshall On The Fringe

Shelley Marshall On The Fringe

Written by Shelley Marshall FRINGE MEANING: 1. not part of the mainstream; unconventional, peripheral, or extreme. “fringe theater” I remember the moment exactly: I logged on to my computer and there in my Inbox was a “Congratulations”. “What’s this about?” I thought. I had no idea the lottery list for the Toronto Fringe had been released and there amongst the alphabetical winners was “Shelley Marshall”. I could have traveled to Toronto from my country home the night before to be there for the live announcement but the chances of this small town woman about to hit 40 getting selected into the Fringe was as slim as my waist in 1985! After the rush of joy, tears, and a spin in my office chair, I called every living soul’s phone number I knew – some TWICE! I learned of the Fringe Festivals while on a mental ward.  I had been committed after a failed suicide attempt and a dear friend brought me up a trilogy of one-women shows written by Sandra Shamas. I ate it up. I especially ate up the preface that revealed she wrote her first one-woman  show on the plane to Edmonton where Sandra would perform it the next day. I thought to myself, I could do that!  I often say I am going to do things and I think of a million things I want to do but I always fall back on my couch with a longing and a not knowing how to do it. I filled out the forms for the Toronto Fringe, closed my eyes and imagined sharing my story.  The story of how I went from a broken woman, standing on a chair in my garage begging for freedom from the demons of my past. That play was called “Phoney”, a thirty minute piece that changed my life. It did not win any awards or get pick of the fringe.  It had low attendance some nights and no big producers came out to see it and take it to Broadway. But what it did do was life changing. It taught me to dig deeper, to really go to the place inside that has worked out its shit and now has the fermented wine of goodness and authenticity. That Fringe showed me that I could finally complete something I set out to do; it connected me with other artists who, like me, crave to express their art and soul. Fast forward 7 years later and I am basking in the honour and excitement of being nominated for the Canadian Comedy Award for “Best One Person Show” for Hold Mommy’s Cigarette the revised and honed version of my first Fringe show.  I thought winning, “Best Theatre Production in Hamilton”, Now Magazine was my happy ending to this adventure but life is beautiful and if you share your spirit, create your work to express the best – and maybe the worst parts of you , you’ll truly feel alive and that will bring others alive! I am honoured to be hosting the Opening Night Gala for this year’s Hamilton Fringe Festival, my home where my story takes place.  Please come and join in supporting and celebrating these beautiful souls who will be telling their stories, sharing their visions and living their dreams.   Shelley Marshall “Best...

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