Hamilton Fringe Festival

An 11-day unjuried theatre festival that happens every summer in downtown Hamilton

The Fringe Blog!

A Story That Must Be Told: The Ties That Bind

http://hamiltonfringe.ca/wp/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/The-Ties-That-Bind-2016-trailer-smaller-2-1.mp4   The Hamilton Fringe talked to James Ince, writer and actor of the solo show The Ties That Bind. Here’s what he had to say about his writing process, coming to Hamilton, and ending the stigma of mental illness.  Can you describe a little bit of how this play came together, and why theatre felt like the right medium to communicate this story? The Ties That Bind is a story that must be told, but it is the type of story that is not told nearly often enough — the story of the survivor; the story of the person who lives with Mental Illness, not the sufferer.  Sam Ward’s story began to emerge about eight years ago.  I was painting images of emotions (if you will) and despair.  I found myself painting the same image over and over, just able to convey what I was trying to say and I thought to myself, “Perhaps this is just not the right medium.” I began first with writing just words, or lists, some of which still exist in the final piece. Then, seemingly otherworldly, “Sam Ward” seemed to be writing the words of “his story” himself.  It was as though he was working through me, through another dimension, or time, or — dare I say — another past.  That was many years ago and I have been a happy prisoner ever since!  Through several years of work, slowly, carefully but always methodically forward, Sam Ward’s story was finally told.  It is an honour to continue telling it here at the Hamilton Fringe. You describe your play as a “brutally dark comedy about mental illness.” How does humour fit into this piece and help tell and humanize a tale of living with depression? I honestly feel that laughter is, maybe not “the best medicine,” but certainly an important, healing and powerful tool.  I think it is more Sam’s perspective in which he views the world we live in as having a lot of humour in it — even absurd at times.  Sam has a lot of heart; I think that even when it is at his very darkest moments, he is always searching and reaching for the light. And that light is hope. Your show description mentions that the main character has “spent most of his life trying to deal with the fact that he is not normal, which is normal to him.” How is this idea of normality destructive? How does the show treat the idea of “normality”? I think everyone, at one time or another, has probably felt “apart from” or out of place whether they care to admit it or not.  I think people are terribly afraid to admit that.  The danger of “normal” I think, is that it is a misconception, a lie.  So even if people try to “fit in,” what we’re all really just trying to do is hide — both from ourselves and to those around us.  I don’t mean with clothing, hairstyles or the music we choose to listen to, but at the very core of our beings.  As Sam Ward says, “If we’re all different, if we’re all individuals, then what exactly is “normal?” What do you want Hamilton audiences to take away from this work? I would like the audience to take away an idea, a...

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Top 5 #HamFringe Trends

Written By: Stephen Near Here we are for another Fringe Festival in Hamilton, and the roster of shows just seems to be getting better and better with each passing year. For the first time since 2012, however, this will be a Festival where I will not be featured as a playwright or performer. Now, you might think this has caused me a bit of ‘buyer’s remorse’. A nagging feeling, if you will, that I should have taken my chances and entered the lottery. But honestly, I’m looking forward to getting out to the Festival simply as an audience member to see what’s in store. But like any audience member, the wide variety of shows presents me with the age old question: what should I see? Last year, I wrote a blog entry on the Top 5 Trends of the Hamilton Fringe which really informed my choices on what to see over the eleven days of the festival. So, why not do it a second time? Here’s my take on the top five trends for #HamFringe #FemmeFringeHamOnt Once again, this year sees many provocative stories written, produced and/or starring women. Ranging from one-person monologues to gallery shows to full length plays, these works shine a spotlight on just a handful of women making their mark in Canadian theatre.   Award-winning Hamiltonian Colette Kendall brings Tippi Seagram’s Happy Hour to her home at the Staircase along with Canadian theatre legend Nonnie Griffin in Sister Annunciata’s Secret. Christel Bartelse also returns to Hamilton with the comedy All KIDding Aside, while Fringe alum Rose Hopkins brings her short play What Happens in the Backroom to the Gallery Series along with the drama Rosemary by Erin Burley and the satire Ashes to Ashes by Rye & Ginger Productions. Toronto’s Rosemary Doyle is back with August Strindberg’s The Stronger featuring Tracey Rankin and Julia Sgarlata, while writer/director Olivia Fasullo navigates the circles of Hell in Devil in the Details, and Pardon My French by Iris Gardet-Hadengue and Anne Marie Scheffler tells the Tales of a Parisian Mom in Canada. Going Solo A staple of every Fringe, one-person shows are an opportunity to witness a raw theatre performance in action. Whether they’re dramatic monologues, comedic romps bordering on stand-up, or incorporating aspects of physical theatre or storytelling, solo shows are often unfiltered and a chance to be part of a powerful voice onstage. Some solo shows are found in other categories, so check out some other of this year’s highlights: Brazil’s Ewerton Martins mashes card tricks and clowning in El Diablo of the Cards, while Irredeemable sees Fringe veteran Michael Nabert promise tales of climate apocalypse, and Erik Helle explores the stark contrast between shadow and light in Chiaroscuro. At Mills Hardware, Carlyn Rhamey takes audiences on a personal journey through Ireland and Scotland in Saor (Free), while Ottawa-born multi-disciplinary artist Nicholas Dave Amott tells the haunting take of Awoken, and Phil Rickaby of Keystone Theatre fame returns to Hamilton to tell us about the pitfalls of taking a crap beside the Almighty in The Commandment. Off the Wall Fringe shows break all sorts of boundaries especially when they move away from the script and embrace other aspects of theatre like clown, movement and dance to give audiences an altogether different experience. Often the hidden gems...

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The Work in Progress: Part 2

Written by: Ryan M. Sero Where were we? We were exploring process and marketing of the different companies of Frost Bites. Last time, you read about Alyssa Nedich and Jeremy Freibuger, using video, blogs, and images to reach out and make connections. If you didn’t, maybe go read that. They had interesting things to say about process. I know you’ll love what Anna Chatterton and Rose Hopkins have to say about their processes. Normally, says Anna Chatterton, she would document her process, and she would absolutely use that documentation in a marketing campaign. Her Frostbites experience, though, isn’t “normally”, given that her play Within the Glass is opening at Tarragon Theatre – she’s a little busy right now.   The time frame she has been working with for her show at Frost Bites, Liatorp, hasn’t allowed those luxuries, so the process has been different. She does indicate, however, that with devised work – site specific projects included – she is very focused on documentation and the sharing of those documents. She says that she is “…always including audiences into my development process along the way to production. But these are pieces that take years to create.” Years, are you paying attention? The normal process that Chatterton goes through had to be truncated and catered to the specific needs and possibilities of Liatorp, and so audience feedback and years of development has been confined to the director and actors, who Chatterton (the playwright) says she got feedback from during the creation process. The main takeaway here is Chatterton’s dedication to the process. If she has the time, she refines for years, using documentation as a way to build the piece – both through marketing and intrinsically, as part of the creation process. If she doesn’t have the time, she still puts in the work, it just takes a necessarily different form.   It’s important to learn this, as an artist or an audience member, that art is work and toil. Whether a (relatively) short gestation period, like with Frost Bites, or with a longer process taking place over years (sometimes decades), it is important to maintain dedication and discipline. If you are an artist, appreciate this and learn. If you are an audience member, give it a thought the next time you are in a theatre; the thought about how much effort went into the work of the performers on stage. Every production from the smallest amateur ten-minute play festival to the largest theatres on Broadway are filled with artists taking time and, through a process of refinement (as Chatterton is describing for us) creating these productions. Give a thought to that; I don’t think you’ll see theatre quite the same ever again. What has the dedication yielded? A piece built to grow Chatterton’s affiliation with Hamilton and other artists residing here. “I wanted to do it for purely creative reasons, I wanted to do more work in Hamilton, I love the Cotton Factory, love site specific work, and I wanted to work with these three artists (Chris Stanton-director, Mike and Juno Rinaldi- actors) …so it’s a great opportunity to try out a new collaboration.” “Process is very important to me.” I’m talking with Rose Hopkins, co-creator of The Distance Between Us and the Sun. She explains that she uses...

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The Work in Progress: Part 1

The Work in Progress: Part 1

Written by: Ryan M. Sero “You have to come and see my show,” is the mating cry of the artist. You can hear this yelled on street corners during every Art Crawl and every line-up at the Fringe Festival. This is the basic element of the indie theatre beat, artists who need you, the audience, to stay still for an hour (or more or less) and take in the thing they have made. The most basic elements are word of mouth, press releases, previews, reviews, flyers, and posters, and that foghorn blast, “You have to come and see my show,” spoken as a plea, both for the welfare of the performer and for the welfare of the audience member; the artist knows that you might miss something special. There’s another way to let people “in” on a show’s merits, to show them more directly that something special is going on. Many artists document their process – they record (somehow) their behind-the-scenes work – and use this document to show patrons (you – yes: you!) what they stand to miss out on. Over the past few days, I’ve been speaking with some of the companies involved in the Frost Bites about their documentation and marketing and what that means for their process. This is “part one” of a two-part blog where I talk with four of the Frost Bites performers. In this instalment, I talk with Alyssa Nedich and Jeremy Freiburger about their process documentation and how they market their shows. I spoke first with Alyssa Nedich, choreographer for the show Deva. She has been using social media to disseminate videos of her team at work. As useful as this is for marketing, the clips are originally created during rehearsals for another reason. “We always document so the dancers can look back at videos for references outside of rehearsal. Also I keep all videos I film of rehearsals in case I ever want to bring a piece back for something in the future.” second Deva rehearsal was a blast today. These girls are seriously blowing me away! @sdowhun @liz_dance8 @lgiovinazzo #dance #frostbites #hamont A post shared by Alyssa Nedich (@anedich) on Dec 28, 2015 at 3:19pm PST Nedich is focused on using these clips to improve the work – that comes first. Any marketing acquired through this documentation is the cherry on top. “If someone sees one of my 15 second clips that we share and sees how talented the dancers are and it inspires them to come and see us, that’s excellent!” The clips themselves are short, usually fifteen seconds long. That might not seem like a lot, but after watching a bunch, the information conveyed is massive. Even though a full sense of the piece’s arc cannot be gleaned, a viewer can quickly see the talent and effort being put in here. These women are working hard and creating something very interesting. They’re well worth watching and really show some intriguing work. Nedich tells me the clips are used to fine tune the piece moreso than completely reshape it. It’s rare, she says, that she re-choreographs the work based on these videos, but says that the video clips do affect the work, allowing her and the dancers to hone and fine-tune their piece. One more because these girls...

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Beating the post-Fringe Blues

Written by Annalee Flint With another Hamilton Fringe Festival recently finished, many members of the theatre community have the “Post-Fringe Blues”. Something about working so hard on something and spending so much time with like-minded people make it a bit of a let down once it is all over. Yet we also think about how lucky we are to have such an event in this city. A place where a variety of genres and styles of independent theatre can flourish. A place where theatre artists and patrons (and artists who are also patrons) can mingle while discussing, debating, and inspiring one another. A place that brings together people from every corner of the theatre community with such an incredible sense of camaraderie. It would be wonderful if we could keep that feeling going all year round. Of course it is unrealistic to think that it’s possible but wouldn’t it be nice if we didn’t have to wait a whole year for another event like that?   That’s what the participants of the Artistic Leadership and Entrepreneurial Training (ALERT) program, which is run by the Hamilton Fringe Festival, were thinking about when given the task of producing a winter theatre festival. And thus, The Frost Bites Festival was born. With the tremendous success and growth of the Hamilton Fringe Festival in recent years there is obviously a strong desire in this city for unique and independent theatre offerings. As the Fringe has expanded its audience size, number of performances and venues it uses, it would also be great to be able to expand the amount of independent theatre that occurs year-round. Many Fringe Festivals across Canada have associated winter festivals, the Next Stage Theatre Festival in Toronto and the Undercurrents Festival in Ottawa to name a couple, so creating a winter festival associated with the Hamilton Fringe seems to be the next logical step in its expansion. The ALERT team, under Hamilton Fringe Festival guidance, was given the duty to figure out what we wanted out of a winter festival. What we came up with is an incredibly exciting event that will have people hyped up about the future of theatre in Hamilton. Frost Bites was created to energize and strengthen independent theatre in Hamilton. There has been a real push in the past few years to give a platform to new works by local artists and playwrights. The HamilTen Festival and the Player’s Guild First Stage Series are two excellent examples of that. The Frost Bites Festival aims to be another place where artists will go to innovate and develop their original work to showcase what homegrown talent has to offer.   “THINK OF IT AS A BUFFET.” We wanted to foster a unique and innovative theatre event while appealing to a broad audience that includes both theatregoers as well as people who may otherwise shy away from the theatre. The result is a site-specific performance event. Site-specific theatre has many definitions, depending on who you talk to, but the simplest description of it is theatre that is created for and/or informed by the particular space the work will be performed in. The idea of Frost Bites being a site-specific festival is to demystify the world of theatre and perhaps even make it more casual. Some people can be intimidated...

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Full of Laughs: The Fringe Talk Show!

Larry Smith is the host of the nightly Fringe Talk Show at the Fringe Club (aka the Baltimore House) This will be his SIXTH year hosting! He tells us a little about the show and what it means to him.   I am so looking forward to my 6th year hosting the “FRINGE TALK SHOW”. Not only is it a great time, full of laughs and entertainment but it’s an entertaining and informative forum for shows at the Fringe, not only as a way to promote the show, but also a great way for audiences to hear about the inspiration, and a lot about the work that went into each show. All walks of Fringe life are interviewed, including actors, directors, and producers, as well as the all important seldom seen heroes of the Fringe-  the tech people, volunteers, and designers.   A lot of the live entertainment during the talk show, is provided by performers in Fringe shows. In the past we’ve featured music, poetry, dance, puppets, magic, cooking demos, and more! As host I also present a small stand up comedy set at the start of each talk show (I celebrated 26 years as a fulltime comic in April) and I turn each guest’s name into a cartoon picture while their interview takes place. We have quizzes, games, and other fun stuff to keep the audience involved. On the final night of the talk show, “The 6th ANNUAL LARRY AWARDS” will once again be presented to Fringe shows, and people from the audience that have joined us for the fun, that is “THE FRINGE TALK SHOW” Over the past years it has been my absolute pleasure to facilitate a forum where talented people from all over the map, can not only promote their shows, but also through an interview give us a deeper look, and understanding of their production. My motto for the “FRINGE TALK SHOW” has always been….“It’s a show FOR and ABOUT everything FRINGE” I’ve met great people over the last few years, so come on out to the BALTIMORE HOUSE each night of the festival at 9 p.m. and have a blast like we’ve had over the past 6...

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The Top 5 Trends at the HamOnt Fringe

Article contributed by: Stephen Near Stephen is a writer and performer in Finding Mr. Right, which plays at the festival starting on Friday July 17 The Hamilton Fringe hasn’t started yet but in just over a week we’ll be up and running. The Festival has grown by leaps and bounds in recent years and that means more shows and more artists are flooding the festival schedule with a wide variety of shows. If you’re like me, you want to see as much as you can but are also curious to see what sorts of shows will be onstage for this year’s festival. Are there any particular trends making waves or any particular styles or stories emerging from the pack? Having taken a look through this year’s schedule, here’s my take on the top five trends for #HamFringe 1. #FemmeFringeHamOnt Borrowing a trending hashtag from Toronto’s Fringe, this year’s festival will see a great number of shows written, produced and/or starring women. From one person monologues to full length plays, these shows highlight the talents of just some of the women making waves in Canadian theatre nowadays.   Hamilton Arts Award winner Lisa Pijuan-Nomura premieres She Said Saffron, while Canadian Comedy Award-nominated performer Colette Kendal brings her smash-hit The Cockwhisperer…A Love Story to the Festival. Canadian Comedy Award Nominee Christel Bartelse performs her critically-acclaimed ONEymoon, while Toronto-based improviser Magdalena BB brings Death and Dating to the stage, and emerging Hamilton performer Rose Hopkins performs The Rabbit Done Died. Alyson Parovel premieres her socially-conscious Always Unique, Totally Interesting, Sometimes Mysterious, and watch for Kelly Morden and Emma Letki‘s delightful kids show Thumped! alongside Hamilton’s own Studio Babette Puppet Theatre with Where Are You Cinderella? 2. Flying Solo A staple of any Fringe Festival is the one person show. Drawing upon a wide variety of disciplines from physical theatre to storytelling to stand-up, one person shows offer audiences an intimate connection to a single performer onstage. Some solo shows are found in other categories so you’ll want to check out some other of this year’s highlights.   Harrison Wheeler’s acclaimed Jesters Incognito makes a return to the Fringe, while magician Chris Bruce tells us Why Card Tricks Are Important. Celebrated British comedian & storyteller Gerard Harris offers A Tension To Detail, and local actor/activist Adam Bryan performs Homeschool Dropout, while Hamilton stage veteran Julian Nicholson tells of Drinking, Fighting, and Fishing, Toronto stage performer Michael Posthumus commands KNEEL! DIAMOND DOGS, while standup comedian and storyteller Zak McDonald recounts The Happiest Story I Know, and Richard Lett brings us Sober But Never Clean. 3. The Big Show Although this year’s festival has many small shows with one or two performers, there are some that have far more company members sharing the stage. Large ensembles, telling grander tales, seem to be a growing rarity in the Fringe circuit so you’ll want to be sure to get to some of the following shows by some notable Hamilton theatre artists.   The 10/10/10 Project is an ambitious multidisciplinary piece by acclaimed Fringe veteran Aaron Jan, who is also premiering the comedic ensemble Rowing with Chrysalis Workshop. Long time Fringe favourite and award-winning Make Art Theatre brings Shakespeare back with Much Ado About Nothing, while Kintsukuroi Productions and Hammer Entertainment present the interdisciplinary ensemble piece Bloom. Toronto’s Aidan Tozer...

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Fringe for the Whole Family!

School is out for the summer, and if you’re looking for all-ages fun at the Hamilton Fringe, look no further! Geared towards entertaining children and adults alike, Family Fringe has two amazing shows and FREE activities every Saturday during the Festival.   We spoke to Studio Babette Puppet Theatre member Kerry Panavas from Where are you Cinderella?, as well as Toronto-based dance artists Emma Letki and Kelly Morden from Ten Toes Productions, who are bringing their delightful show Thumped! to the Theatre Aquarius Studio.   What are the most rewarding and challenging parts of creating an original show geared towards children and families? Emma and Kelly: It’s rewarding when children look up to you and you have the ability to enhance and expand their imaginations while encouraging their creativity as well. It can be challenging to create a dance show that translates clearly for young audiences while also trying to appeal to adults. It’s important to us that the adults in the audience enjoy the show just as much as the kids because it is ultimately the parent’s decision to take their kids to see us perform. Kerry: Making a show that appeals to all ages is a rewarding challenge, because although the entertainment must be geared to the youngest ages, we also want the parents to come away with a smile on their face, which means the mature ones in the audience have a little chuckle too!   2)   Although this is your first time participating in Hamilton Family Fringe, both of your companies have experience performing child-friendly theatre. Has there been a particularly memorable audience reaction from one of your past shows? Kerry: We perform a show called Young Sophia: the Dundurn Castle Diary, inspired by the diary of Sophia MacNab, written in 1846, aged 13, at Dundurn Castle. The way students of today react to, and sympathize with, the trials and tribulations of Victorian children, is always heart-warming and totally endearing. Emma and Kelly: It’s funny because we originally didn’t see our company doing children’s theater. However, after our audience’s reaction from Pluto’s Revenge in the 2012 Toronto Fringe Festival, we realized that our style of theatre tends to bring out the silly playful side in adults while at the same time bringing about themes of vulnerability. When Ted Fox from Evi-Dance Radio approached us and asked us why we weren’t classifying our work as children’s theatre, and we were stumped, it suddenly all made sense! It was like we found our unicorn. Kelly has become very active in children’s dance education since Pluto’s Revenge in 2012 and her experiences with kids have added a whole new layer to our work. 3) What do you hope Hamilton audiences take away from your show? Emma and Kelly: We hope that our show will inspire Hamilton audiences to cherish, preserve and explore the diverse and rich environments that surround their own backyards. We hope that our show will encourage children to take their imaginations outside and explore the types of entertainment that nature has to offer. Kerry: That you are never too young, or too old, for fairy tales! And that puppets speak a universal language for children, who seem to immediately suspend any disbelief, and embrace the idea that these puppets are actually living, breathing...

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Artists Emerging from the Indie Scene in Hamilton

ALERT (Artistic Leadership and Entrepreneurial Training) is a new year-round arts education initiative that connects emerging artists in Hamilton, gives them opportunities to participate in workshops led by top professionals in Canadian theatre, and engages them in planning committees for a winter festival- set to launch in February 2016. As emerging artists, many of the participants have shows of their own in the 2015 Hamilton Fringe, including Esther Huh and Rose Hopkins. Rose will be performing her one-woman show, The Rabbit Done Died, as part of the Gallery Series, while Esther is acting in Make Art Theatre’s production of Much Ado About Nothing. We spoke to both of them about their experiences as young artists in Hamilton’s burgeoning theatre scene!   1) How important is community in the Hamilton indie theatre scene right now? ESTHER: Very! Hamilton indie theatre is just getting established and as such, there are few formal avenues to organize. That’s the challenge and beauty of any indie theatre scene – those that are motivated to make art, will, but motivation is essential. In a place like Hamilton, where the community informs the kind of stories you want to tell and produces storytellers of many different backgrounds, the necessity of drawing on others for support and the practical needs of putting on a show make the experience richer. ROSE: SO IMPORTANT! When I moved back to Hamilton last year after finishing my BFA in Windsor, I was blown away at how welcoming the theatre community was. I’ve met so many people in a short period of time who have been so generous with their mentorship and support. If it weren’t for them, I don’t think I would have created Mooncalf Theatre or be producing The Rabbit Done Died at the Fringe this year.     2) What are the benefits and challenges of spending time with young emerging artists, as you learn together? ROSE: The benefits: Hearing about the awesome projects my ALERT colleagues are working on, learning new things about the way they work, create, and produce, and applying bits and pieces of that to my own process The challenges: Trying to get eighteen extremely passionate and creative minds to focus on one thing at a time. ESTHER: Young artists have an amazing energy, especially when they get together. There’s an optimism that comes with being a young emerging artist. The other part of being a young emerging artist is the “young” part – we collectively don’t have a lot of experience, especially when it comes to the practicalities of doing big things.     3) Although it is early on in the program, has ALERT changed your expectations or inspired you to reach new goals? ESTHER: The program is making me realize that generally, my expectations for myself are far too low. My cynicism stops me from taking on big projects sometimes. I’m learning that the best way to conquer a lack of experience is go ahead and do whatever and trust that the effort will be rewarding in the long run (and the short run too, hopefully). ROSE: I love the workshops and planning we do at ALERT meetings, but more than that, I love chatting with the other artists on breaks and talking about the struggles we’re all facing as new emerging professionals. It...

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Gallery shows that GREW

Two of the full-length shows programmed at the Hamilton Fringe Festival this year premiered as short pieces in the Gallery mini-Series: Trevor Copp’s Air appeared at the 2014 Fringe and Radha Menon’s Ghost Train Riders (which has now been developed into the full-length Rukmini’s Gold) was a part of the 2013 festival. We spoke to playwright/creators Radha and Trevor about what role the shorter presentations at the Gallery mini-Series played in their development and how their shows have grown since!   How has your show changed since it was in the Gallery mini-Series? TREVOR:  Back then, I didn’t know what I had. I was throwing stuff against the wall to see what would stick. I since stepped back to ask what it was I am trying to accomplish, to bring intelligence (and work and design and more rehearsal….) to what was instinct. Now the piece incorporates full design, is double the length, and reflects the fact that I know I’ve found a voice in this work. RADHA:   Thanks to an OAC grant, I was able to develop the initial scene Ghost Train Riders into a full-length play over four-months that summer and have a staged reading in December 2013 at the Lyric Theatre. In development with Kali Theatre (U.K), the play was then workshopped by six actors in London led by director Trilby James in July 2014 and these explorations provided real breakthroughs. Readers’ notes were provided and a new draft was written and had a staged reading at Tristan Bates Theatre in Covent Garden as part of Kali Theatre Talkback 2015. It started off as a 20 minute show and has grown to 100 minutes (we are cutting a scene to keep within the 90 minute show slot for the Fringe.)   What is the value of having an audience while your show is still “young”? RADHA:   I fall in love with many of my characters and as with other things one loves, one hope that others will love them too. Having audiences see seed plays really helps because it gives a writer the certainty that this story and these characters are worth the time spent developing them. I was blown away by the audience response from Ghost Train Riders at our Gallery Series show – it struck a chord with so many people, mostly everyone was able to relate to this play and all the positive feedback reassured me that this certainly should be a full-length play. TREVOR:   In physical theatre especially, the audience is the final scene partner. Until they show up, I really don’t know if we’re together and really in flow. I got to find out what worked and where the holes are. I actually got out to Ottawa and St. Catherine’s as well to keep testing the material. I wouldn’t call this process ‘valuable’ – for my kind of work, it’s a requirement to achieve the kind of quality that makes a show last years.   The Gallery mini-Series is billed as SHORT shows in SMALL spaces. When did you know that your SHORT show would grow larger and your SMALL space would need to be bigger?   TREVOR:   The combination of people asking if I’d do the old pieces again and the new pieces keeping me up at night because they didn’t exist yet. RADHA:  I had already planned to...

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