Hamilton Fringe Festival

An 11-day unjuried theatre festival that happens every summer in downtown Hamilton

The Fringe Blog!

Stage Directions: Second Edition

Stage Directions: Imagining the next steps for theatre in Hamilton (An Open Space Meeting) How do we build a better, stronger theatre culture in Hamilton? Who is responsible? What is your role? What does the future look like?   In March 2014, about 60 artists from the Greater Hamilton Region gathered together for a full day of discussion about the future of theatre in Hamilton. The day was filled with dynamic and passionate dialogue about the state of the performing arts in the city. This meeting of minds led to the formation of several fruitful partnerships and the launch of a series of new programs. So we have decided to do it again.   On Saturday March 14th from 10am-5pm, we invite the theatre and performing arts communities in Hamilton to gather for an ‘Open Space’ meeting to talk about the future.   Do you want to help direct growth in the Hamilton theatre community? Let’s get together and talk about it. Join in the discussions! Connect with like-minded people!   How do ‘Open Space’ meetings work? Open Space is a meeting style meant to harness the intelligence and passion of the people in the room. Participants meet all together, and then form smaller groups around their specific area of interest. Much unscripted dialogue to follow! Then we join up again to share ideas for growth. The agenda is set on the day by you – the passionate people who show up to talk, plan, scheme, and get things done.   Who will be there? Everyone who is a stakeholder in the community is invited to attend! Actors, directors, designers, writers, producers, musicians, singers, performing artists, translators, technicians, dancers, teachers….. Anyone interested in the theatre culture in Hamilton! Anyone passionate to see it grow… The DETAILS: Date:              Saturday March 14, 2015 Time:             10am-5pm* Location:      Players Guild of Hamilton Fee:                $10 Sign up:  Advance registration is required. Limited space available. The event filled up very quickly in 2014. Please BOOK EARLY to avoid disappointment. Book ONLINE HERE. A dynamic way to affect understanding and aspirations in our theatre community. Be a part of this vital process! *please note: This is a FULL-DAY event. Pizza lunch will be provided!   Stage Directions 2015 is presented by the following partner organizations: Cobalt Connects, Hamilton Arts Council, Hamilton Fringe Festival, The Player’s Guild, Theatre Aquarius  ...

read more

“…We Won At Theatre.” Romeo & Juliet: An Escapist Comedy

Written by Denyse Terry Edited by Rebecca Raveendran Ryan M. Sero and company return to the Fringe this year with Romeo and Juliet: An Escapist Comedy. Sero typically relies on small teams and exchanging characters. With six cast members and a dizzying array of roles, Sero remains true to style. Taking the tale about two star-crossed lovers and their feuding families, Sero goes full absurdist on us. From their press kit: “Romeo has a lot on his mind: his girlfriend has dumped him, he just fell in love with Juliet, the daughter of his enemies, the Capulets, and he can’t find meaning in life. Not only that, but try finding a decent barber.” The affable 27 year old explains, “It’s vaudeville turns into Marx brothers turns into Greek Tragedy.” The Fringe has been home to a few of make.art. theatre’s productions. A Modicum of Freedom was ‘Pick of the Fringe’ in 2009. In Between Places happened in 2010. Don Quixote followed at the 2011 Fringe Festival and was playfully nominated for “Best use of a wheel barrel” by View Magazine. Last year we got Jack and Jill Bieber-Fever a ‘Best in Venue’ winner. Romeo and Juliet: An Escapist Comedy got its start at Theatre Aquarius’ Playwright’s Unit two years ago. What initially started out as an assignment turned out to be a hit which he took to the Pearl Company Canadian Theatre Festival in 2012 where it was the best attended show. “The dialogue is witty, smart and hilarious.” Ontario Arts Review 2012 “I’ve sort of Woody Allan-ized it.”says Sero, referring to his oft sited inspiration who he admires in part for the way he takes “…big things, like love and death; those themes are never exhausted. They are equally unfathomable.” Sero takes 60 minutes to explore those themes, “…from a different angle, using comedy.” More comfortable when he is either writing or acting, Sero is cast as Romeo. Directing this romp through love is Tyler Brent. Well known for the Hamilton grown Sketch Comedy Troupe The Ugly Stiks and last year’s Zombie hit, Bridezilla vs The Apocalypse, Brent has a well-developed funny bone himself. The two met at Fringe 2010 when they shared a venue for their plays (Brent’s Purple and Sero’s In Between Places). Both successful, Sero says that’s when he first heard a now favourite line, “We won at theatre.” Since then they have worked together often, alternating acting and directing roles. Brent teaches by day and just seems so staid-like it’s always fun to see his comedic take on things, this time as Tybalt (cousin to Juliet, rival of Romeo’s) as well as Juliet’s wet-nurse! and confidante. The role of Juliet is played by Hamiltonian Annalee Flint (Billyboy, and Anno Domini 3048, both 2008). “I love Annalee’s Juliet.” Says Sean Emberley (Grey Gardens, To Kill A Mockingbird, Amigo’s Blue Guitar) A musician and actor, Emberley’s love of theatre started in high school but he left it alone for 17 years until one night he saw a performance by the Ugly Stiks and, “I was amazed by it. That people could do that and actually make a living.” He volunteered at Hamilton Urban Theatre, and got to know Brent while working on a number of the Bard’s works (also with Hammer Entertainment). Emberley has four roles,...

read more

Shelley Marshall On The Fringe

Written by Shelley Marshall FRINGE MEANING: 1. not part of the mainstream; unconventional, peripheral, or extreme. “fringe theater” I remember the moment exactly: I logged on to my computer and there in my Inbox was a “Congratulations”. “What’s this about?” I thought. I had no idea the lottery list for the Toronto Fringe had been released and there amongst the alphabetical winners was “Shelley Marshall”. I could have traveled to Toronto from my country home the night before to be there for the live announcement but the chances of this small town woman about to hit 40 getting selected into the Fringe was as slim as my waist in 1985! After the rush of joy, tears, and a spin in my office chair, I called every living soul’s phone number I knew – some TWICE! I learned of the Fringe Festivals while on a mental ward.  I had been committed after a failed suicide attempt and a dear friend brought me up a trilogy of one-women shows written by Sandra Shamas. I ate it up. I especially ate up the preface that revealed she wrote her first one-woman  show on the plane to Edmonton where Sandra would perform it the next day. I thought to myself, I could do that!  I often say I am going to do things and I think of a million things I want to do but I always fall back on my couch with a longing and a not knowing how to do it. I filled out the forms for the Toronto Fringe, closed my eyes and imagined sharing my story.  The story of how I went from a broken woman, standing on a chair in my garage begging for freedom from the demons of my past. That play was called “Phoney”, a thirty minute piece that changed my life. It did not win any awards or get pick of the fringe.  It had low attendance some nights and no big producers came out to see it and take it to Broadway. But what it did do was life changing. It taught me to dig deeper, to really go to the place inside that has worked out its shit and now has the fermented wine of goodness and authenticity. That Fringe showed me that I could finally complete something I set out to do; it connected me with other artists who, like me, crave to express their art and soul. Fast forward 7 years later and I am basking in the honour and excitement of being nominated for the Canadian Comedy Award for “Best One Person Show” for Hold Mommy’s Cigarette the revised and honed version of my first Fringe show.  I thought winning, “Best Theatre Production in Hamilton”, Now Magazine was my happy ending to this adventure but life is beautiful and if you share your spirit, create your work to express the best – and maybe the worst parts of you , you’ll truly feel alive and that will bring others alive! I am honoured to be hosting the Opening Night Gala for this year’s Hamilton Fringe Festival, my home where my story takes place.  Please come and join in supporting and celebrating these beautiful souls who will be telling their stories, sharing their visions and living their dreams.   Shelley Marshall “Best...

read more

On The Fringe with Darren Stewart-Jones; Sherlock & Watson: Behind Closed Doors

On The Fringe with Darren Stewart-Jones; Sherlock & Watson: Behind Closed Doors

Written by Denyse Terry “There is nothing more deceptive than obvious fact.” So spoke Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s tenacious character Sherlock Holmes over 120 years ago. Today, for writer & director Darren Stewart-Jones, that is just a challenge. Stewart-Jones talks happily about bringing his latest play, Sherlock & Watson: Behind Closed Doors to Hamilton Fringe’s Gallery mini-Series and his favourite venue from last year, the Factory Media Centre  at 228 James St. N. Employing a bit of Holmes’ famous deductive reasoning, Stewart-Jones imagines Holmes, and his consort Watson…well, consorting. “It’s not overtly sexual, but there is sexual tension there.” Referring to the fifty-six short stories and four novels of the sleuthing duo as ‘the canon’ Stewart-Jones gives us a clue about his status as a huge fan. “I’ve always loved crime and mysteries…and I always imagined a more intimate relationship between Holmes and Watson. Even in my early teens I thought what Conan Doyle says is a little more than suggestive. “ When the copyright expired on Conan Doyle’s collection (all but 10 short stories), Stewart-Jones found the works just too tempting. We saw some of Stewart-Jones’ skill at understanding and morphing history with last year’s play the Judy Monologues. Based on voice tapes from Judy Garland that was, “captured brilliantly” according to the Hamilton Spectator’s Gary Smith. For 2014 Stewart-Jones creates the authenticity again by using Conan Doyle’s words extensively throughout the 20-minute piece. Sherlock & Watson: Behind Closed Doors opened last year in Gay Play Day, a festival of LGBTQ theatre Stewart-Jones founded. A member of the Playwrights Guild of Canada, Stewart-Jones has  produced and directed plays at Buddies in Bad Times Theatre, the Alumnae Theatre, Toronto Fringe, Hamilton Fringe and the London One Act Festival. He is also Artistic Director of the popular HamilTEN –a festival of 10ish minute plays by playwrights from Hamilton and surrounding areas. Says the UK born creator, “When I moved to Hamilton I asked myself what I could do to make my mark and be creative in this city.” HamilTEN recently enjoyed its third year at the Pearl Co. Sherlock & Watson: Behind Closed Doors has been recast for Hamilton. You will get to meet Mark Keller (Alarm fur Cobra 11 – Die Autobahnpolizei, Mountain Medic) as Sherlock and Louis Adams (The Metronome, It’s not Easy Being Greek) as Dr. Watson. Stewart-Jones likes the Gallery mini-Series, and the challenge of conciseness. “The play really does stand on its own.” We will get to see what happens when Stewart-Jones stages an ‘intervention of sorts’ when Watson returns to 221 Baker St after his marriage to find Sherlock in a downward spiral. “It’s seamless now.” Stewart-Jones says, pleased with the development of the play. “It marries the new and old together. “ “The addition of small gallery plays to this year’s Hamilton Fringe is a welcome thing indeed. Let’s hope this is going to be part of the Fringe from now on.” Gary Smith, The Hamilton Spectator, July 2013. Stewart-Jones’ company Baby Gumm Productions is also presenting Emerald City – A Musical Play based on characters from The Wizard of OZ books that, “…take a detour off the yellow brick road and find themselves in group therapy with Dr. Oz, Psychiatrist…” at the Toronto Fringe. If you want a total spoiler experience you...

read more

Of Galleries and Conspiracies

Written by Stephen Near Conspiracy theories are the mythology of the information age and, regardless of whether they’re rooted in real-life or paranoid fantasies, society seems addicted to them. Take the strange and tragic case MH370. A casual Google search will reveal a wealth of sinister scenarios explaining the real reason for the jetliner’s disappearance. And with the flight still missing, who is to say any of these theories are false? That’s the allure of the conspiracy theory. In the absence of evidence, conjecture leads to belief and belief becomes proof. For me, the real intrigue lies in the absence of information and how it acts as a focal point for our worst fears and suspicions. Not long after the disappearance of MH370, I started thinking about how conspiracies are born out of tragedy. The greater the tragedy or crime, it seems, the more people need to believe in conspiracies. I ended up meeting with director Aaron Joel Craig, with whom I had worked on Test at last year’s Fringe, to talk about how these theories are a bizarre coping mechanism for grief. This led us to imagine what it might look like for a man to be trapped by his own demons of loss with the only way out being conspiracy theories. The more we talked, the more I realized I was finding my way around a far more personal loss in my own life: the passing of my mother from cancer last year. Part of me didn’t want to explore that absence in my life but the more Aaron and I talk the more I realized there might be something here to be unveiled and uncovered. At first, the story existed as a single character onstage but when Aaron suggested the addition of a second character – a sister reaching out to her brother for support – the piece began to come alive. In the words of Aaron, “that’s the play… that’s where it lands.” With the addition of Lauren Repei to our plot, as it were, we started work on The Conspiracy of Michael. But it hasn’t been straightforward. Much like the theories of our protagonist, the play’s evolution has taken twists and turns. For one thing, we didn’t start with a script. Much of the dialogue has emerged from a series of improvisations between myself and Lauren guided by Aaron in the studio. As a playwright, this form of collective creation is uncharted territory. It’s exciting but also a bit unsettling. As Lauren says, “there are so many ideas floating between the three of us about this show that meetings/rehearsals have really had a buzz to them. We all want to build a world, and then tear it down… in less than 20 minutes.” The constraints of the gallery space as a performance venue have also been a crucial factor. With a narrow space and only 20 audience members, we’ve been asking ourselves how to embrace the setting as part of the story. Lauren observed that “we really have to buckle down and focus and make every syllable and breath count.” The Conspiracy of Michael is shaping into a unique theatre piece but a bit of an experiment for us as artists. Will it work at the Fringe? To be honest, we’re not entirely sure....

read more

A Language For Dogs

Written by Denyse Terry For Sale: Hamilton. A new and ingenious play is coming to the festival this year and it sounds like a very good time indeed. There are realtors. There is a tour. There is some Hamilton history and drama, along with some  loss and change. Above all, there is inventiveness.   Meeting recently with York University students Chelsea Haraburda- (performer, designer and director) Hayley Pace (designer/photographer/singer/performer) and Bessie Cheng (performer and deviser) I got a tease of a story about how new theatre company Outrun The Mill plans on selling our fair city. Haraburda, Cheng and Ryan Percival (actor/devisor) play realtors who are actually selling space. The space they are peddling is the real life Hawk & Sparrow, a vintage clothing store at 126 James St. N. “And by selling that, we are actually selling the city.” says Haraburda. The collective, inspired by, “the contradictory relationship of Hamilton’s emergence as an artistic hub and the city’s Torontophobia, is experimental and physical; sometimes tongue-in-cheek, sometimes very very serious. Percival plays a realtor from Toronto who is desperately trying to take advantage of the popularity of Hamilton while pretentiously holding his nose.  The issue of  gentrification comes up with Pace playing a ‘typical Hamiltonian’ who becomes displaced and who hopes, through her character, to engender compassion instead of disdain. “Change is hard on everybody. If someone gets displaced – I hope we show compassion and see them as people who need help.” Characters appear from different time periods. There’s the 1940’s, with Haraburda playing an agent who sees Hamilton through rose colored glasses and is brimming with hope for Hamilton’s potential. Cheng’s agent/character lives in the modern day and is also full of hope but for very different reasons. A unique element of the play is that it starts by taking its audience members on a tour. Beginning at the Citadel Theatre (28 Rebecca St.) ‘Tour Guides’ will arrive to divide the group and take you on one of four distinct tours. You all end up back at the Hawk & Sparrow and that’s when the action really begins. This is 60 minutes of physical and devised theatre folks. What is devised theatre you may ask? Good question. Devised theatre basically starts off as improv. The script develops collaboratively and by the time the show is ready to be staged and seen it is fully developed and fixed. With Aaron Jan as dramaturge ( Drafts, Best of Hamilton Fringe 2012) and Lucy Powis as stage manager & Asst dramaturge (2013 Fringe, A Little Too Close To Home) we are all in for a treat here. A treat that has had a lot of Hamilton thought put into it. The play’s name, A Language For Dogs, has an appropriately tail-wagging connection, “We are trying to speak to Hamilton literally as man’s best friend. The issues we cover all reflect Hamiltonians so people who aren’t necessarily into theatre will enjoy the play because at the end of the day, it’s about their city, their home.” says Haraburda. Heading into the experience that is A Language For Dogs, keep in mind that the four tours from Citadel Theatre to Hawk & Sparrow that set the stage are all unique to each area. Can you expect something different if you go more...

read more

Your First Theatre Experience. What Do You Remember?

Written by Crystal Jonasson Do you remember your first theatre experience?   The first memory I have of the magic of theatre was seeing Sharron, Lois and Bram at Hamilton Place with my parents. Even as a young child it was clear to me that there was something special about live performance, something unique about hearing my favourite songs and seeing the performers ‘for real’. Singing along with my three favourite musicians and their elephant companion obviously left an impact that has lasted decades. I know that for me these early memories shaped how I think about theatre and the arts in general. The Fringe values the impact that theatre can have on young people and strives to make theatre accessible to artists and patrons of all ages. That is why this year the Hamilton Fringe Festival and Theatre Aquarius are proud to bring you the first ever: Family Fringe. Family Fringe was created to offer patrons easier access to family-friendly performances – and to support local artists interested in bringing their work to children and families in our community. Companies offering children’s theatre are performing in one venue, Theatre Aquarius, and have been scheduled for convenient show times. Wondering what to do with the 12 & under crowd? We have you covered over both weekends in July. In addition to the Family Fringe Shows, children’s arts activities will be offered on both Saturdays of the festival in the greenspace on the west side of Theatre Aquarius in the Family Fringe Tent. These additional arts activities will include face painting, T-shirt decoration, music and more. Activities in the Family Fringe Tent will be hosted by local children’s artists and dedicated Fringe volunteers, all FREE of charge! In planning this new project I have had an opportunity to talk to several children’s artists, volunteers interested in working with children and with parents of young children, and I have discovered a special type of enthusiasm. The enthusiasm and excitement born of sharing your passion for the arts with the next generation of artists and arts supporters, it’s contagious.   Got the Family Fringe bug? To volunteer for Family Fringe call: Yara Farran 289 698-2234 volunteer@hamiltonfringe.ca If you are an artist who would love to share your work/activity with children and their families, over two Saturdays (July 19 & 26) contact Crystal Jonasson:...

read more

On The Fringe with The Bell Ringer

Written by Denyse Terry Been to Paris lately? No? That’s alright; it’s one of the reasons we love the Fringe. This year you can find a ‘minimalist’ recreation of the famous cathedral in Notre Dame, Paris, once home to Victor Hugo’s ‘hunchback’ Quasimodo. If you have not read the Hunchback of Notre Dame lately, here’s a quick synopsis: Using the Notre Dame Cathedral to represent all of society Hugo drops in the disfigured Quasimodo, who is judged by his looks rather than his character. His adoptive father, who exercises multiple nefarious motives, is given the benefit of the doubt, due in part to his more appealing looks. The beautiful gypsy Esmerelda complicates the entire story because: woman, leading the main character Quasimodo to alternately love, save, lose and eventually turn to dust by her side. In this new adaptation, Bending Reality Productions take the 183 year old story and, while focusing on the obvious physical disability of the main character (now called Caleb) and the resulting stigma around that, they enhance this theme by taking a broader look at male body image and sexuality. A central question of The Bell Ringer is how and why the dark themes of Hugo’s work are still relevant to today’s standards of the human body. Using a circle, some ropes, original music and a lot of lighting effects, this incarnation brings both light and inquiry to a male’s perspective on disabilities, desire and body image.   Exuding energy and intelligence Taryn Crankshaw, Jessica Marshall and Concetta Roche all giggle nervously about the productions ‘creepiness’ and ‘eeriness’. Joining them in this drama/horror show are co-director Cameron Love, and cast members Phil Krusto, Julie Diab, Charles Wallace, Danny Johnston, Mackenzie Potts, Justin Mackie, Kit Simmons. The show’s creators all met at McMaster University and developed The Bell Ringer for the Honours Performance Series there. Winning Best Sound, Best Original Script & Best Set Design in that series, they’ve since added more scenes to the 60 minute performance. Co-writer and asst director Taryn Crankshaw dug into the topic of disabilities and says the group wants to, “…address stigma. There is such a pattern of stigmatizing disabilities. We wanted to create a character who could explore his desires, his sexuality.” “We’ve added a lot of symbolism” says co-writer and lighting designer Concetta Roche (actor in Jamie’s Gone, 2013 winner of Best of Fringe). “We’re looking at social justice issues then and now.” From Hamilton, Burlington, Brantford and Cayuga, Bending Reality Productions was founded specifically to put on a Fringe show. “Hamilton has an amazing art culture that keeps us coming back to collaborate for projects.” T. Crankshaw. “We wanted to take an old story and make it relevant to modern day.” Says Director Jessica Marshall who thought she was going to be an English and History major but got derailed by a workshop at Theatre Aquarius and ended up double majoring in Theatre & Film and Multi Media and the rest was, well, history. No less appropriately than taking a novel that has been hailed as the first work of Epic Theatre, there is a certain sense of harmony that The Bell Ringer comes to Players Guild, the oldest community theatre in North America, having adapted itself over its 139 year history. And while it may have...

read more

Reaching Youth In Hamilton

  The Hamilton Fringe Festival draws thousands of people into the downtown core every year. Contributing to the city’s growing arts and theatre culture, the festival is a vehicle for local, national and international companies, emerging artists and senior artists, to showcase their craft and advance their skills. Now approaching its 11th year the Festival keeps growing and growing, exploring new performance spaces and formats, attracting a wide variety of performers and an even wider audience. If you are an experienced ‘Fringer’ then you already know all this! You know about the dedicated volunteers and the passionate artists. You may still have a Fringe button or two and the stories to accompany them (*see below, let us know). Perhaps you are one of the many theatre enthusiasts looking forward to a festival you know and love. You may NOT know that the Hamilton Fringe Festival is also working to have a positive effect on the Hamilton community in other ways. As the Festival grows new ways to engage and impact our community are being explored. One way in which the festival is working to make this impact is by reaching out to youth in our community. The Youth Access Pass, affectionately known as the YAP, was developed for the 2013 Fringe and its distribution has been expanded for the upcoming 2014 festival to allow eligible youth to access to the Festival free of charge. The pass is designed to facilitate access to the arts in our community for youth who may face economic, cultural or other barriers. These passes allow each participant access to complimentary tickets for up to 10 performances of their choice during the festival. These complimentary tickets are offered to participants on a ‘rush’ basis. This means that paid patrons will be accommodated first and then if seats remain they will be made available to Youth Access Pass participants. In coordination with youth outreach workers and the Hamilton Wentworth district school board we are hoping to reach more than 300 youth this year. The Hamilton Fringe Festival strongly believes in creating an accessible environment that empowers young people to engage in their community through arts and theatre. As the Associate Producer it has been a part of my job to connect with youth workers in Hamilton to increase the distribution of the YAP. Every time I speak with a youth worker and explain the program I get the same overwhelmingly positive response. Youth workers are excited to offer this program to the young people they work with and I am excited to be a part of that. For some of the youth, using a YAP may be their first experience with live theatre. The Fringe offers an impressively diverse selection of performances each year allowing youth to develop their understanding of different types of theatre as well as the opportunity to see what types of theatre are being created here in their community. The Fringe Festival is also a chance for young Hamiltonians to discover a volunteer-based organization that can allow them to positively impact their community while enjoying the excitement of theatre. In the future we hope to expand this exciting program to effectively engage even more young people here in Hamilton. For more information about the YAP program write to us here: outreach@hamiltonfringe.ca If you’re interested...

read more

Your Backstage Pass To The Fringe

Written by Robyn Cunningham   I was born with an addiction… to theatre. When my friends in elementary school were carrying lunch boxes plastered with the faces of Simba, The Little Mermaid and Pokemon, I was begging my mom for one with the cast of Rent or Les Miserable. Growing up in a rural community, my peers were not exposed to theatre in the way I was. My mother being an actor/musician and my sister working in the Toronto theatre community, gave me a unique insight into this magical world of make believe that I found much more compelling than any animated film or TV show. As I grew up, I learned that my addiction was uncommon. I learned that loving something whole-heartedly the way I embraced the stage, was sometimes seen as uncool or “nerdy”. This dilemma was only worsened by the response of my high school guidance counselor, who appeared in catatonic shock when I shared my ambitions for theatre school. I remember her words exactly to this day, “… but don’t you want to be able to get a job?” I responded between clenched teeth, “No, I would like to be able to have a career.” This type of negative outlook is the inspiration behind my idea for the Backstage Pass Program. This program is a chance for emerging artists to gain experience and knowledge about the theatre community that is located right on their doorstep. In many high school’s guidance departments, theatre school and careers in the arts tend to be handled as a risky choice. In my experience when someone doesn’t know about the arts, especially their local community of working artists, it is difficult for them to provide a clear outline of expectations. This program is designed for students who are eager to infiltrate the theatre community and learn from the pros who’ve already crossed these barriers of creative negativity. We want to show emerging young artists that they can thrive with hard work, dedication, knowledge and support of artists around them. So many young people believe they must escape to Toronto, Vancouver or New York to really participate in a thriving theatre scene. This program is here to prove otherwise. The Backstage Pass at the Hamilton Fringe grants young theatre artists in the local area a chance to get involved in one of the city’s most valuable and influential theatre festivals. During the 11-day run of the Hamilton Fringe, members of the Backstage Pass will get a chance to: See 10 Fringe shows Participate in talk-backs with Fringe artists Take workshops with local industry professionals Gain insightful knowledge from guest artist talks AND  develop entrepreneurial skills under the guidance of Fringe staff and associates If you are interested in pursuing a career in theatre, this is an opportunity not to be missed. To receive an application form, please email Robyn at outreach@hamiltonfringe.ca. Robyn is a theatre artist and a proud new Hamiltonian. Upon graduating from the Dramatic Arts Department at Brock University in 2012, Robyn was chosen as the Directing and Dramaturgical intern with The Shaw Festival. Since completing her internship Robyn has expanded her passion in theatre by working for The Toronto Fringe Festival, SummerWorks Theatre Festival and Malabar Costumes in Toronto. Robyn looks forward to a long future with the...

read more