Hamilton Fringe Festival

An 11-day unjuried theatre festival that happens every summer in downtown Hamilton

The Fringe Blog!

On The Fringe #8

On The Fringe #8

Written by Denyse Terry PLAY: Around Miss Julie COMPANY: Hopegrown Productions DETAILS: Written by: Harry Standjofski. Directed by: Norah Paton LOCATION: Citadel Studio SCHEDULE: Thu, July 18 6:30pm; Sun, July 21 2:30pm; Mon, July22 6:30pm; Tue, July 23 8:00pm; Thu, July 25 6:30pm; Fri, July 26 10:00pm; Sat, July 27 2:30pm   Five folks from Hopegrown Productions recently piled in to their rehearsal space to skype- chat about their upcoming play, Around Miss Julie, and their extensive travel plans for the summer. The 45 minute show recently opened in Montreal and was nominated for Centaur Theatre’s Best Production: English Theatre Award. From Montreal they head to Ottawa, then London, Ontario. On to Burlington, then  Hamilton in July and, after taking a two week break, Around Miss Julie opens in Edinburgh Scotland. What a road trip! What a summer! Hopegrown Productions was founded last fall. Co-founders Miriam Cummings, Lindsey Huebner, Samantha Megarry, along with director Norah Paton, are all recent grads of the Theatre Performance program at Concordia University in Montreal.  Having picked up a fifth, Mitchell Cohen, they all have roots in Ontario and are excited to be returning in what they call their “Hometown Tour.” Megarry grew up in theatre in Burlington. She became familiar with the Hamilton scene as a volunteer for Theatre Aquarius. The team has a solid sense of what they wanted their premier project to be and some strong talking points: “We want to play our own age and gender, we want to explore themes and experiences that are underrepresented in Canadian theatre, and we want to tell womenʼs stories, not menʼs stories featuring women. “Hereʼs a dirty theatre secret: the majority of theatre school graduates are women, yet there are very few good plays full of strong roles for young female actors. We were looking for female characters that were interesting and engaging. We soon realized that finding a play with three fully-developed female characters was challenging to say the least. This was alarming to us. Why don’t women have story lines that stand alone, independent of a male protagonist? Why aren’t women portrayed as comedic, in the way that men are?” So they went back to their Concordia professor and mentor, Harry Standjofski. Standjofski is a well-known actor, playwright, and musician and has been just as frustrated with the lack of female roles in contemporary theatre. He is known to write original works for his classes so female students don’t have to play guy’s roles. Hopegrown commissioned him to write an original play and Around Miss Julie is it. It’s a clever premise, starting with August Strindberg’s classic, Miss Julie. Standjofski has written a play within a play -or rather a play about putting on a play. It is a multi-layered comedy that blurs the lines between rehearsal and reality, “…the cast tangles with themselves, each other, and a …dead bird.”  Yes, they laugh, there are a few surprises built into the story. “Our designer (Sonya Vallis) is going to do something very funny with that.” Around Miss Julie looks at, “…the uncertainty of being 20 something, the hilarious and sometimes manic process of putting on a play and the relationships we develop or destroy along the way.” You don’t need to be familiar with Strindberg’s Miss Julie to be in on the...

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On The Fringe #7

Written by Denyse Terry Play: The Whirlwind Company:  Street Opera Productions Details: Written by: Doug Massey, Directed by:  John Addison Location: Citadel Theatre Show Times:  Fri. July 19, 6:00pm; Sat.  July 20, 3:00pm; Sun. July 21, 6:30pm; Wed. July 24, 8:00pm; Thurs. July 25, 10:00pm; Fri. July 26, 8:30pm; Sun. July 28, 10:00pm   If you want to learn about Hamilton’s history, I recommend a sit down with historian Doug Massey. A Fringe veteran, he played the acclaimed role of Mr. Kane in a trilogy of Hamilton Fringe plays: The Right Turne (2007) The Left Turne (2008) and Turne Around (2009). He also produced Robert Savoie’s play Escape at the Fringe in 2011. Massey admits he caught the Fringe bug.  This time around he has another fascinating story to tell – and a unique way to tell it. His new play, The Whirlwind, is a drama based in history, that shines a new light on some of the controversies surrounding the Battle of Beaver Dams. Working from first-hand accounts in The Journal of Major John Norton, Massey crafts characters that challenge the notion of Indigenous people as warriors. “Social Justice is at the root of everything I do.” says Massey. The idea for the play came from his extensive work on the film, The Battle of Beaver Dams: An Uncommon Courage. Co-written with Jeremy Major, the docudrama tells the battle story primarily through the eyes of the Grand River people. These Indigenous troops were greatly outnumbered but employed psychological tactics in order to triumph over the Americans during the war of 1812. Many battles were fought in this area; the Battle of Beaver Dams took place just west of Niagara Falls, in what is now Thorold Township, on June 24, 1813. Advancing American troops, planning to surprise the British at Beaver Dams, made a fateful rest-stop at Queenston Heights, home to Laura Secord. Secord then set off on a 27 km trek to warn the British that the Americans were coming. There has been some controversy over the significance of her trek. Nevertheless, the U.S. troops were ultimately ambushed by Indigenous warriors and surrendered. Massey says the battle was won as much by words as it was by weapons. When he finished working on the film, “There were still issues left over, issues that people need to know about. The Whirlwind is the final piece of the puzzle.” With a grant from the Hamilton Bicentennial Committee, Street Opera Productions set to work. Massey wanted to explore themes like courage, wisdom, humility and spirituality. He asks in the play: What it courage?  Is it the strongest fighter?  Is it the last one standing?  Or is it more?  Massey loves weaving film and live theatre so expect a segment from the film. Carla Zabek (Imaginary Invalid, Escape, Suddenly Last Summer) plays Laura Secord, “It was a role I just couldn’t refuse.” Zabek has also done extensive research on her character. Of the controversy over whether or not Secord played a significant role in the outcome of the Battle of Beaver Dams, Zabek says, “She made that trek two days before the battle. So she had to be significant.” Massey himself plays Colonel Charles Boerstler, who lead the 14th U.S. Infantry at the Battle of Beaver Dams.  Boerstler apparently reviled one Dr....

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On The Fringe #6

On The Fringe #6

Written by Denyse Terry Play: Bridezilla vs. the Apocalypse Company: BrainDeadPan Productions Details: Written by: Aaron Middlemiss. Directed by: Steff Bishop Lampman Location: Citadel Studio Theatre Show Times: Thurs. July 18, 9:30pm; Sat. July 20, 1:00pm; Sun. July 21, 8:00pm; Tues. July 23, 6:30pm; Wed. July 24, 9:30pm; Sat. July 27, 8:00pm; Sun. July 28, 1:00pm I wasn’t sure what to expect when I set off to meet the folks behind Bridezilla vs. the Apocalyyse. I have never, ever, met a zombie before. That day I was tired – and a little frazzled. I was late – thanks bus! I had grabbed the wrong notebook (red! because zombies!). It was just one of those days. Whatever I was expecting – what hit me, when I first walked in, was a massive air-wave of camaraderie. A most friendly and hospitable bunch: these folks are having a good time making theatre. Writer Aaron Middlemiss and director Steff Bishop Lampman have collaborated on a dozen shows in the last 15 years.  A horror aficionado since childhood, Middlemiss got the idea of marrying a wedding day to a zombie apocalypse after proposing to his own wife. Thankfully she has a sense of humour too. Bridezilla vs. the Apocalypse premiered at Blackbox Fire’s Emerging Artists Series last summer. For the Fringe production there are more characters, more zombies, and, “We’ve definitely ramped it up. There’s quite a few technical changes.” Technical? He smiles slowly, “The blood and guts.” Truly a part of the fun, and the culture, the first two rows of the studio will most likely be designated a ‘splatter zone’.  They have a pit crew for cleaning in between shows. A pit crew. Has anyone ever thrown up or fainted? Middlemiss deadpans, “No. And I feel like we failed.” One of his favourite stories is of him making intestines in the kitchen sink. He was a little worried when his bride walked in and said, “What are you doing?” “I’m making guts”, was really the only possible reply. Over rising laughter, Middlemiss explains zombie culture further, “Zombies have always been the archetype for ‘the other’ and how we view ourselves against it. They are like the original 99%.” Also intrigued by themes of self-identity, and exploring which ‘side’ ultimately supersedes the other, even he was surprised at how graphic his writing got. Going over scenes with Bishop Lampman he says, “We were killing ourselves laughing.” Bishop Lampman likes that the characters are multidimensional. “I also like that there’s a strong woman in the play who is confident with her sexuality. She owns who she is, even though she is still figuring it out.” Local support has been fantastic, she adds, with Copydog, Sweet Ice Snow Cones, Jack & Lois’s Diner, Killer Cupcakes Goremet! and the Baltimore House helping out on their recent fundraiser – where many dressed the part – and none more willingly than John Migliore, Hamilton’s resident celebrity zombie. At 1am, on his way home, Migliore was driving up the mountain when he got stopped by the R.I.D.E. program. The officer takes one look at him and says, “What the hell is this?” Migliore tried to explain his zombie situation. The cops says, “Okay I want you to drive up to the next officer, she needs to see this.” He drives...

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On The Fringe #5

Written by Denyse Terry Play: Frankenstein Fragments Company: Blue Ceiling Dance Details: Choreographed and Performed by: Lucy Rupert Location: James North Studio 328 James St. N Show Times: Fri July 19, 6:45pm, 8:15pm; Sat July 20, 3:45pm, 5:15pm, 8:30pm; Sun July 21, 4:30pm, 7:45pm, 9:15pm   The Gallery Mini-Series is a first for the Hamilton Fringe, the concept simple and inviting: it is BIG ideas in SHORT shows in SMALL spaces. Three galleries on James St. North are hosting a wide variety of shows over 2 weekends. On the first weekend, Lucy Rupert , founder and Artistic Director of Blue Ceiling Dance, brings Frankenstein Fragments to the James North Studio. Over the phone, Rupert tells me she has danced in some unusual places: a hospital, a museum, staircases, window wells; she likes to take advantage of every aspect of the architecture with her choreography. We talked about life, motherhood, her turning forty –  and being at the top of her game; we talked, at length, about Frankenstein Fragments. “This is a nice piece for people who haven’t seen a lot of contemporary dance.  You don’t have to worry it’s going to be too abstract. In Frankenstein Fragments I’ve literally stitched together choreography from my early years to more recent works and I reinterpret them. I am literally sewing myself up.” Rupert often juxtaposes  the ‘dark’ with the ‘shimmery’. “I like the idea of Frankenstein – he’s accessible, he’s gangly, he can’t quite cope with life. He’s a clumsy monster. So it’s a little sad, too. We all know Frankenstein in some way, as campy, as a part of pop culture. The story is like a modern day Prometheus. I am definitely making fun of my former self a little bit, the angsty teen thing, but the shimmering aspect to me is always about trying to find the beauty in things. ” Rupert says her teen years were pretty unhappy. She was bullied and teased a lot. She lost both parents at a young age.  “So I’ve had a lot of darkness in the earlier parts of my life and the only thing that would get me through it and not be really morose and sad – as an artist and as a human being – was to try and illuminate the dark parts, illuminate the sadness.  By putting myself on stage, in terms of Frankenstein Fragments, as a bit of a clumsy monster, illuminating that through art, I can maybe make a little bit of beauty for the world and maybe provoke a little bit of empathy.” Born with one leg longer than the other, she was dancing by age four as a way to avert potential postural issues. She loved it. She fell in love with the piano as well, and completed the first and only Joint Honours Bachelor of Arts degree in Dance and Music at the University of Waterloo, training as a classical pianist and singer as well as ballet and modern dance. She completed her Masters in History in 2003, “Just for the joy of learning!” the same year she founded Blue Ceiling Dance. Described as, “one of Toronto’s dance intellectuals” by the Globe and Mail, Edmonton VUE magazine goes on to say, “Lucy Rupert offers a supple spine and liquid arms crowned by an...

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On The Fringe #4

On The Fringe #4

Written by Denyse Terry PLAY: Jamie’s Gone COMPANY: Broken Soil Theatre DETAILS: Written and Directed by: Michael Kras LOCATION: Citadel Theatre SCHEDULE: Thu, July 18 6:00pm; Fri, July 19 7:30pm; Sat, July 20 8:00pm; Sun, July 21 12:30pm; Tue, July 23 9:30pm; Fri, July 26 4:30pm; Sat, July 27 11:00pm   Michael Kras is a busy young man. Just turning 20 years old, he has taken turns as a magician, an actor, playwright, director and blogger. For him, it’s about the stories: “I haven’t stopped telling stories since I was born. And I’ve always looked for different ways to tell them. Even as a little kid I would create theatre, try to take on something like juggling or singing, or something – some way to express myself and my stories.”  The naturally talkative Hamiltonian grins, “I was the attention seeking child between my sister and I – I still am to some extent.” His sister Megan Kras doesn’t seem to mind. She has helped out on publicity before, designing the poster for Jamie’s Gone, and the logo for Kras’ new company, Broken Soil Theatre. Founded to give a place for young artists to grow and express themselves, Kras clarifies, “We are ‘youths’ in theatre, but this is not ‘youthful’ theatre.” Jamie’s Gone is a bit of a dark piece, with a large ensemble cast of emerging theatre creators: Matthew Blackshaw, Alisa Blanchard, Robert Brown, Devin France, Jesse Horvath, Danny Johnston, Philip Krusto, Kayla Mazepa, Concetta Roche, Kit Simmons, and Hannah Wayne, all in their late teens to late twenties, all from the GHA, playing a wide variety of ages and characters. Kras says Jamie’s Gone is, “A true collaboration – the set, costumes, script…everything.” He started auditioning in early March, getting an early start on a project that is very near and dear to him. The play has been staged twice before, first at Kras’ high school, and then again at the Sears Ontario Drama Festival where it was nominated for the Wayne Fairhead New Play award, and won the Award of Excellence for Playwriting and Direction in 2012. This incarnation has been, “Completely re-imagined.” In Jamie’s Gone, Kras takes the disappearance of a young boy and uses that as a framework for some larger themes and commentary: deceit, fear, narcissism, faith, and the struggle for power and redemption. It’s a surreal journey into the small town of Vernon – a made up, isolated town full of outcasts who, having failed at numerous other tasks, set upon building a town for themselves. There are experimental elements and a lot of physicality; original score by John Salib. Kras’s passion for this project runs high – though you get the sense that Kras pours his heart and soul into everything he does. His first theatre company, ‘Steeltown Players’ was founded in 2011, opening with a double bill at the Staircase Theatre. The two plays, award-winning Shut Down and the newer Wasp’s Nest, “…went well. I was just beginning to write my own work and I kind of wanted to see if I could take it to a more public venue. “That was hard. It was a lot of work. My family helped a lot. I’ve learned a lot since then.” Since then Kras completed a year at Humber College, which he says...

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On The Fringe #3

On The Fringe #3

Written by Denyse Terry PLAY: Betting On The Riverman COMPANY: Haywain Theatre DETAILS: Written by: David B. Fraser.  Directed by: Julian Nicholson LOCATION: Hamilton Theatre Inc. SCHEDULE: Fri, July 19 7:00pm; Sat, July 20 3:30pm; Sun, July 21 6:30pm; Mon, July 22 6:00pm; Fri, July 26 6:00pm; Sat, July 27 9:30pm; Sun, July 28 12:30pm     Just another clandestine rendezvous. This time with Julian Nicholson, director of Betting On The Riverman.  And alas, the north side of the café is not so very quiet. The police are enjoying their coffee rather loudly. Over their clatter Nicholson sets the stage: The entire play takes place in a casino hotel room. There, you meet Eddy, a long-time gambler whose luck has truly run out. He is desperate to come up with the money he owes, before the Riverman comes calling. What’s a Riverman, you ask? The Riverman is the person who fishes dead bodies out of the nearby river. Dead bodies of gamblers. Like Eddie. The Riverman is actually a woman, played by Carol Riddel. Nicholson says, “It’s a fabulous role. She uses her sexuality and warmth in order to entrap men into more gambling, so she can go after them for more and more money.” Rick Kanary plays Eddie, Kimberly Jonasson is Eddie’s fed up ex-wife, and Nicholson himself plays Eddie’s rather insensitive father. If all this sounds a little familiar – it should. Betting On The Riverman played at Hamilton’s Fringe in 2009 – that year directed by the play’s author David B. Fraser. If Fraser’s name rings a few bells too, his play Gerald Hilroy’s Guide to the Art of Seduction won the Fringe’s scriptwriting competition in 2008 and, directed by Nicholson, played to packed houses and critical acclaim. “We had a wicked time.” Says Nicholson. “It was great.” Nicholson and Fraser have known each other since their McMaster days. So when Fraser called and suggested a remounting of Betting On The Riverman, Nicholson quickly agreed. Says Nicholson, “This play is more important than ever – because of the debate over casinos. It’s marvelously written. When I first saw it I loved it. I mean, I’ve always enjoyed Dave’s writing. His dialogue really hits the audience with the appalling effects of gambling addiction on a family. It’s an intense play. More intense, this time around. And really, more relevant than ever. It just snaps… It really moves along.” Nicholson has moved around quite a bit too. Originally from Lowestoft, County Suffolk, in England he retains a mild, and charming accent. He landed in Winnipeg originally, then on to Burlington, and finally Hamilton in 1985. He speaks really quickly, but softly, remnants of his accent getting drowned out by the louder cops. For 33 years, Nicholson has acted steadily in community theatre. At McMaster, where he graduated with a BA in Drama, he was Artistic director for the 1990-91 Summer Drama Festival. By 2000 he was in British Columbia, working with Paul Thompson on the Governor General’s Literary Award winning play, Elizabeth Rex, co-created by another familiar name, Timothy Findley. Nicholson continued in independent theatre. In 2011, Nicholson caught a feature part in the police thriller, ‘A Case of Deceit’. “Oh there’s lots of blood and bullets in that one.”  The film, after showcasing in Cannes, is going...

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On the Fringe #2

On the Fringe #2

Written by Denyse Terry PLAY: TOM, DICK & HARRY COMPANY:  C.A.S.T. Inc DETAILS: Written by Langille MacGregor. Directed by Byron McKim LOCATION: Citadel Theatre SCHEDULE:  Sat, July 20 6:30pm; Sun, July 21, 2:00pm; Mon, July 22, 9:30pm; Wed, July 24 6:00pm; Fri, July 26 6:00pm; Sat, July 27 9:30pm; Sun, July, 28 12:30pm   We’ve all sat through uncomfortable dinners. You know the ones – full of cringe inducing double-entendres, your partner’s bad puns, drunken uncle dropping his fork in it. Again. The dinner scene in TOM, DICK & HARRY will arouse that memory, but this time you will be safely ensconced in your theatre seat, able to watch as somebody else does the seat-squirming for you. For the past 25 years, Burlingtonian Byron McKim has sat in a lot of seats, dealing with multiple subjects, through drama, dance, and comedy. Taking a break from directing plays for BOTG (Burl-Oak Theatre Group) in order to premiere Langille MacGregor’s TOM, DICK & HARRY, McKim says, “I am really excited! Being back in the trenches, where you have to improv, you have to be sharp, in order to make it funny.” In this modern day comedy, Sally is a recent divorcée with three men in her life: her lover Tom, her ex-husband Dick, and Harry – Dick’s lover. Dick and Harry have come over to Sally’s apartment to tell her that not only are they ready to start a family, they would like her to be the surrogate mother. Cue the squirm. Despite some heavy-hitting themes, McKim promises a light-hearted and insightful show. “Does love go away when you get a divorce? Are certain types of betrayals easier to swallow than others? People will go to great lengths to keep love alive.” For both McKim and writer Langille MacGregor, comedy and love are common themes. Macgregor writes, “We’re not always blessed with the families we want. You can choose your friends remember, but you can’t choose your family. Wouldn’t life be better, for some of us anyway, if you could?” Producing and directing TOM, DICK & HARRY was an easy choice, says McKim, who got his start in community theatre. A successful salesman in the early 90s, he got the bug playing Sam Spade at a dinner theatre. Before he knew it, the expensive car was replaced by a bicycle; his house eventually became a one room unit over a tire store. “I threw everything away to go to Vancouver film school. It was a major shift in my whole life…who I was, what I wanted…I spent a good portion of my time, in my solitary confinement room, just writing.” He stayed in Vancouver for ten years. Through the ups and downs McKim has had some pretty spectacular ups. Through his company Soaring Heart Pictures he has written, produced and directed everything from comedy, to sci-fi, to musicals and dance. Nominated for a Gemini Award in 2005 for Quest, an Aboriginal dance program shown on APTN and SCN, he went on to Cannes with his short film, King of Siam. In 2009, Bravo! Aired his six part Aboriginal dance program, “Dancing With Spirit” which brought two more Gemini Award nominations and a Gold Sheaf Award for the last episode in the series, called Tryptych. Back in the GHA with his wife and daughter since 2003, McKim...

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On the Fringe (WTH?)

On The Fringe with Denyse Terry Where will you be Fringing this year? One fabulous factor of the Hamilton Fringe is the volume of shows to take in from July 18-28. This year, our tenth anniversary, theatre companies from Montreal to Victoria, New York and beyond, join Hamilton’s thespians to present comedies, dramas, satires, love stories, musicals, children’s shows – the list this year is bigger than ever. To help you get to know some of the folks offering up Fringe shows this year, we present our new interview series, On The Fringe. I am meeting around town to talk, in person and via Skype, to a variety of companies. Most of these folks are busy in rehearsals right now, in their home city and here in Hamilton. Every week, from now till July, I will be sharing conversations On The Fringe with you. Enjoy! WTH? How well do you know Hamilton? For On The Fringe interviews, I am taking my trusty old-school-notebook to a different location each time. Can you figure out, from the picture provided, WTH (Where The Heck) I am? Test your knowledge of Hamilton while learning about some of the exciting works we are presenting in this year’s Fringe Festival. Enjoy these previews and, if you guess my location correctly, from the accompanying picture, you could win two tickets to that show! Just email me with the location and your contact information: publicity@hamiltonfringe.ca Have fun! See you around Hamilton – and at the Fringe!     Denyse Terry Denyse is a local freelance writer. A Fringe volunteer for the past 5 years, she has served as a member of the Board of Directors since 2011. Her short story ‘Boom’ has been nominated for the Pushcart Prize:   Hamilton Arts & Letters, ‘Boom’ by Denyse Terry...

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On the Fringe #1

Written by Denyse Terry PLAY: Death Married My Daughter COMPANY:  Play it Again Productions DETAILS: Created and performed by Nina Gilmour, Danya Buonstella Directed by Michele Smith SCHEDULE:  Thurs, July 18 6:00pm, Sat, July 20 12:30pm, Sun, July 21 8:00pm, Wed, July 24 9:30pm, Thurs, July 25 7:00pm, Sat, July 27 4:00pm, Sun, July 28 2:00pm One morning last year, just outside Paris, in a dorm room at the prestigious clown school, École Philippe Gaulier, Nina Gilmour woke up with an idea. Quick to share it with fellow student and long-time friend Danya Buonstella, the two took that idea home to Toronto and Michele Smith. Would it work? Could it work? Drawing heavily upon their improv training, the three met day and night to expand and develop their seriously comedic play, Death Married My Daughter. The idea that spawned the theme that travelled home to hatch their production? Two of Shakespeare’s characters, Ophelia and Desdemona, reimagined through Bouffon, in order to denounce gender stereotypes and ‘take the piss’ out of society. On trial here is ‘Man’. Get ready to laugh as they poke fun at some of our more flawed social structures. Along the way, Death Married My Daughter puts some classical touches on modern themes and modern touches on classical themes. A primer:  Bouffon, originally conceived during the French Renaissance and recoined by Jacques Lecoq in the 60s is a performance style that has mockery at its core. The Bouffon were the ‘ugly people’ banished to the swamps, only let out during festivals to entertain royalty, AKA the beautiful people (this time around that’s you dear Fringer). Even via Skype, Gilmour comes across energetically and enthusiastic, “Bouffon really spoke to me -it kind of exploded all our minds! It is still so relevant today.” All three have studied under Gaulier and enjoy the release clowning offers. Says Gilmour, “Bouffon is really needed right now with all the negative things that are going on in the world.” In this time-travelling, role switching carnation, speaking in both classical and contemporary dialogue, Desdemona and Ophelia rise from the swamps to take a swipe at politics, pop-culture, and gender stereotyping. Ophelia, you may recall, was the potential wife of Hamlet. In that play, Shakespeare portrayed both of them as a bit nuts, though Hamlet’s quackery was deemed more socially acceptable for, as a male, he was given far more intellectual curiosities to jam up his synapses. Ophelia wore her madness more blatantly, more hysterically, more…female. In Shakespeare’s play Othello, Desdemona is bracingly strong willed, loving her husband Othello without restraint. Which was also a problem. A female without restraint, nay, with clarity of purpose, was also a dangerous thing. Her husband called her a whore right before he murdered her. “Are you sure this is a comedy?” I ask Gilmour. She laughs through the phone. “It is definitely hysterically funny! It’s definitely biting, too. But we keep it light and comical.” They employ Bouffon, “…at its most charming…it’s meant to provoke thought, to give people something to think about and hopefully inspire change…we paint a broad picture of how far we’ve come, and how far we still have to go. Michele Smith (from Smith-Gilmour Theatre Company) is a great director! She makes sure we stay on track.” For 60 minutes these two recent graduates, Gilmour and Buonstella, will have you in their tracks. Yes it’s social criticism –staged just for your delight. And speaking...

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